Conversation Group’s Discussion Question: Do you have a secret hunch about how you will die?

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Do you? I assume we all do because I know pretty much exactly how it will be, perhaps is. I see my death scenes often when I close my eyes. I hate to write this for fear you will feel sorry for me and try to talk me out of it. Every time I have told anyone, they try and say no way, you can’t know that for certain. Oh yes I can and I do. The sight of me dying has not left or changed since I turned 60. It has not let up or given me choices. It is exactly the same depiction each and every time only a few more machines, tubes and more discomfort, yet I keep saying I will not let go and I don’t.

The sun rises and sets in my knowing how I will die, so it is not like I would hope, quick and easy. It is not a pleasant sight and I do try and change it, try and picture someone else in exchange for me, push the sight from my conscious mind, but alas, I cannot. It is me and I am there dying exactly the same each and every time I go there. Another thing that annoys me is the fact that I have to be dying in my mind so many times. You would think once would be enough, but somehow when I least expect it, I am in my mind again dying, and again there is no change in the room, the bed, the spread, the mumbles all around, the curtains with yellow embroidery swaying and me there lying in repose when the deed is not yet done.

And you? Do you have a secret hunch about how you will die? I know time and again you have asked me not to be morbid, but this is not morbid or sad to me, actually, it is rather comforting. I see no pain!!!

9 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Patricia Rieffanaugh
    May 27, 2016 @ 10:09:08

    I do not see my death. At this stage in life, I only see today and my future and what it promises to hold, and for this I am grateful. So I guess, for me, it will be an unexpected surprise!

    Reply

    • Sheila Clapkin
      May 27, 2016 @ 11:23:33

      Pat,
      An unexpected surprise is all any of us can hope for and how positive. Thank you for a new channel.
      You always see such a sunny side. I see it too, but get caught in the clouds here and there.
      Love and health,
      Sheila

      Reply

  2. joycenmac@roadrunner.com
    May 27, 2016 @ 10:49:39

    Wow, no I’ve never had a hunch about how I will die. I hope I don’t linger in a hospital bed for days, weeks or months. My mother called early one Friday morning here in LW eleven years ago. I rushed over, she went to the hospital and we were with her all day until she passed after 6 pm. Once they gave her morphine she was in no pain. She was 88 and had lived a long happy life. She was bothered by spinal stenosis and peripheral neuropathy her last few years, so we are glad she was no longer suffering. I hope I go as fast, but never had any hunches about it.

    I’m glad in your dreams you are not in pain. Have you visited or been by a lot of dying elderly folks? Maybe that is why you have this hunch.

    Have a good day,

    Joyce

    Reply

    • Sheila Clapkin
      May 27, 2016 @ 11:20:26

      Joyce,
      Thank you for your beautiful insights. I surely do wish you were involved with our original conversations. No, I have not been visited by dying of dead folks, but good for you, I have been studying channeling and getting into trying to understand all of that banter. Kudos to you for seeing me! Also, thank you for sharing your dear mother’s passing. Lovely as she was…
      Love,
      Sheila

      Reply

  3. nuala ryan
    May 28, 2016 @ 15:40:07

    This is timely. I have a very close friend since the 70’s who is dying of pulmonary fibrosis and must be in ICE. Her death has not sunk into my psyche yet!
    In my recent reading I came acroFross a brief dialog between a creative very elderly gentleman and his mentoree who is thinking about retiring. The latter asks what will I do in retirement? His mentor responds, practice dying. This has given me helpful food for thought based on another piece of reading from Irish author John O’Donohue’s book Adam Cara. He suggests that our first important death is when each of us leaves the womb of our mother and death becomes our daily companion. You fit right in Sheila!
    From the first piece I am trying to practice dying I.E. die to self centeredness, to negative thinking, to judgemental thoughts and on and on it goes. Don’t ask how I am progressing?????
    Thank you Sheila for evoking such important dialog.
    Until we meet…
    Keep practicing as it is very lifegiving!!!!!

    Reply

    • Sheila Clapkin
      May 28, 2016 @ 16:37:43

      Peace to your previous dying friend and peace to you in accepting that she is going beyond.

      Thank you for such a rich and powerful comment you have shared. I will keep practicing. In viewing our daily struggles as practice we are at peace with our performances.

      Again, sharing from you my dear friend is precious and always full of honor and love.

      Reply

  4. nuala ryan
    May 28, 2016 @ 15:43:24

    The correct title of the book is ANAM CARA by John O’Donohue’s
    Nuala

    Reply

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